The Hatch: A New Way To Comfort Your Pet While You Travel

Ahoy, Readers!

Today, I’d like to bring you the opportunity to learn about a product that will have excellent benefits for those with special needs pets or just regular old run of the mill pets who have all four legs, all their eyes, functional organs, etc. etc.  Today, we learn about the Hatch!

The Hatch.

The Hatch.

Now, I’m not usually one to tout the merits of a product that doesn’t yet exist, but a very kind letter was written to me by a one Jon Mirsky stating that he loved my blog (thank you), is passionate about special needs pets (good), and is hoping to launch a revolutionary new carrier that will help pets feel calmer and safer during travel. This is where he mentioned the Hatch, a carrier that will allow you to reach in and touch your pet without worrying that your friend is going to escape. Need to give a pill? Open the hatch! Want to offer a calming eyebrow rub to your kitty? Open the hatch! Need to let visiting alien ambassadors onto your ship’s deck? Open the hatch! Actually, that last one probably isn’t a feature of this particular Hatch, but you can still say it. No one will fault you.

Junior, the inspiration behind the Hatch.

Junior, the inspiration behind the Hatch.

The Hatch was a product that Jon came up with while traveling with his buddy Junior, who found his carrier unsettling and distressing. Jonathan wanted to create something that would allow a person to offer comfort and physical touch to their pet without worrying about escape or hassling with difficult snaps and zippers. And so, the Hatch was, um, hatched. It has a visual safety feature on it to show you if the hatch is indeed open and your pet is accessible to you or if it is closed and your pet is safely tucked inside with no escape possible (and I use the word “escape” in the nicest possible way.) The carrier itself is also made of “military grade ballistic nylon,” which sounds so manly and dangerous. Claws (or stumps) find it impregnable, impenetrable, and impervious to snags. Outstanding. It even has seat belt straps and packs flat for when you just want to stash it under your bed.

Sound good to you? Then now is your chance to jump on the Kickstarter to get some perks before this bad boy is released to the public. You’ll get to help fund a neat product that will offer some nice features for special needs (or normal needs) pets and get some discounts and other snazzy donor glitter, as well.

The Hatch in action.

The Hatch in action.

I wonder if my stump would fit through that Hatch…

Love,

Crepes.

FTC Disclosure: This post was sponsored by Hatch and we were paid a small fee for our time to prepare it. We only bring you items that we think are relevant to our readers’ interests and all opinions are our own.

 

Planting for Kitty: Catmints

You guys!

Did you know I garden? It’s true. We don’t have a yard, but I work in the medium of “container.” I’d like to share with you some of the things I’m doing this year, and first I begin with Catmint!

Expert Gardener Crepes

Expert Gardener Crepes

Did you know that catmint is the term for a larger group of plants, of which catnip is only one? True! Some types of catmints may give your kitty the giggles, but others are grown as ornamentals because of their lovely flowers and colors. Of course, the best one is – you guessed it – Catnip!

Catnip is, by far, a cat’s favorite plant in the garden and there’s quite a few interesting things about it that most people don’t realize. It is a perennial, meaning it comes back each year without requiring a replanting.

Known by the Latin-speaking peoples of the world (most of which are dead) as nepeta cataria, this lovely plant also acts as an attractant for butterflies. It’s like a double goodness for cats!

If your peeps don’t want to grow it for you, you can remind them that catnip can also be used as a tea for people (with caution)! True story. It has a history of being used as a relaxant and can be mixed into other teas to add that property to the drink. It also used to be used as a medicine for various ailments AND, apparently, some people smoke it, although it’s not a safe thing to do, according to WebMD. Don’t let your cats smoke it, either.  Pregnant women should not use it as it can, apparently, stimulate the uterus. Thanks to MomFOD, I don’t have a uterus, so I’m cool. Also, in large amounts it may act as an emetic, which means things will start coming out of you real quick.

The oils extracted from catnip have been used to repel mosquitoes, and I’ve read that it can be up to 10x as effective as DEET, which doesn’t give anyone a good time.

This cat is SERIOUS about you not touching his nip.

This cat is SERIOUS about you not touching his nip.

Catnip has the same effect on tigers, lynxes, and other big cats as it does on house cats, although my research tells me that lions don’t much care for it. Poor fellows. Sadly, not all house cats will know the joys of the nip, either. Only about 66% of us are able to enjoy its properties, and the effect is hereditary. To keep dried catnip fresh, you may want to store it in the freezer since the oils dissipate quickly.

Earlier, I mentioned catMINT. Known in Latin as nepeta x faassenii, this mint is frequently grown around roses because it blooms upwards into lavendar, pink, and white blossoms that help cover the sparse bottoms of rose plants. This one is also fine to include in your kitty garden.

If you plan to plant anything for your kitties, make sure you identify it by its Latin name, even though most people will think you sound pretentious. It’s important to distinguish plants from one another in this way to be absolutely certain that they’re non toxic for your cats.

Happy planting!

Love,

Crepes.

 

**Disclaimer: While we have researched to the best of our ability, please use your own judgement in utilizing catmints in your own garden and for your own use. We are not responsible for any ill effects caused by your use of herbs at home. Also, we were not paid for this post. All opinions are our own and we provide the photo of the catnip we use at home for reference purposes only.**

Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nepeta_cataria

Cat safe gardens: http://www.wmassmastergardeners.org/0310.htm

Catmint plants: http://landscaping.about.com/od/groundcovervines1/tp/catmint-plants.htm

WebMd: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-831-CATNIP.aspx?activeIngredientId=831&activeIngredientName=CATNIP

http://pets.webmd.com/cats/catnip-effects-on-cats