Bachelorette of the Week: Olive!

World,

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I’ve decided to spice up your life a bit today with a discussion of Olives.
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Some olives are green or brown, some black. Some are spicy and some mild and a few may have a hint of added flavor. This particular variety of olive is black with a touch of white, paraplegic, and with a definite dose of delicious. She also comes dressed up in a permanently classy tuxedo, sort of like a kitty version of Annie Lennox.
 Olive of the Varietal: Feistus Catus

Olive of the Varietal: Feistus Catus

Please officially meet Olive, a feisty little tuxedo kitty who was found at the age of five weeks and raised by fosters before finding her way to Tabby’s Place, where she now slides around the floors like a snazzy little broom, both lighting up rooms and shining surfaces with her fanny as she travels to greet people.
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Olive doesn’t have any health problems, save for missing the use of her back legs, and Tabby’s Place feels that her Sweet Dreams of finding a permanent home could be realized with just the right adopter. She does wear a diaper since she can’t seem to, um, contain her urine, but don’t tease her about it because, as the saying goes, You Don’t Mess With A Missionary Cat.
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The right home for Olive would be one that would admire her for her spunk, a home that would be able to change her little diapers daily, a home that’s clean and tidy because she doesn’t like Walking On Broken Glass. Is that home yours? Wonderful! Call Tabby’s Place ASAP. Is it not? That’s ok, you can still Put A Little Love Into Your Heart and sponsor this amazing kitty while she searches for her loving forever home. Don’t leave her Waiting In Vain because the love that she’s got and is waiting to share? Money Can’t Buy It.
Don't Touch My Diaper! - Olive.

Don’t Touch My Diaper! – Olive.

Olive shining the floors with her lovely behind.

Olive shining the floors with her lovely behind.

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Love,
Crepes.
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PS. Those were all song lyrics. You weren’t hallucinating.

Bachelorette of the Week: Tanzy!

You guys!

Oh, hey guys. Thanks for, you know, saving me. - Tanzy.

Oh, hey guys. Thanks for, you know, saving me. – Tanzy.

I have a very touching story to tell you today!

World, meet Tanzy (Tanzanite for long), a tiny kitten who was found barely alive only hours after her birth, drowning in parasites, with puncture wounds near her little back. (You can read her complete story here.) With lots of love, patience, and a small tube, Tabby’s Place was able to keep her alive. In fact, she is now more than alive. She is thriving in their care!

Unfortunately, now that she’s up and about, it has become obvious that the puncture wounds have caused damage to her spine, making her a lifelong paraplegic. Tabby’s Place has hope, however! They will begin physical therapy and hopefully, one day, she’ll be fitted with her own pair of wheels. She has to get her driver’s license first, though, so she has a few weeks to go.

In any case, Tanzy is making her way towards the adoption floor slowly but surely. If Tanzy is someone you’d like to have join your home, you’d best keep an eye on her! In the meantime, if you’d like to sponsor this tiny survivor, you can do so here. You also have my permission to print out her photo and wear it around your neck like the precious gem that she is.

Go, Tanzy, go!

Love,

Crepes.

Tanzy most recently. Either she's looking like a Siamese, or she's dipped her nose in something. Either way, she's still great.

Tanzy most recently. She’s turning Siamese, I think she’s turning Siamese, I really think so. (Do do do do do do- do do)

Hurray for Tabby's Place!!!! - Tanzy.

Hurray for Tabby’s Place!!!! – Tanzy.

 

 

 

Psi’s Transport with Frank: From New Jersey to Canada

You Guys!

Psi

Psi

Do you remember about a month ago I asked everyone for help to find a little kitten named Psi transport from New Jersey to an awaiting home with Bailey (mom to Little Meow and D’Artagnan ), the kind young lady who has already adopted two paraplegic cats? Well, we found someone! A wonderful man named Frank O. saw our post on Facebook and was kind enough to help Psi get from New Jersey to Calgary via airplane. He emailed me telling me that he might be able to help. I put him in contact with Bailey and just a few short weeks later, he brought Psi to her new home. I asked Frank a few questions about the trip. Here’s what he had to say:

Crepes: Did you have to go out of your way to pick Psi up?

Frank: No, Lisa from the shelter brought her to me at the airport.

C: What was the flight like? Did you have to carry certificates or papers?

F: The flight was entirely uneventful. Since it was an international flight, I needed certificates from Psi’s vet as well as proof of her vaccination status (specifically rabies).

C: How did the other passengers react?

F: I removed Psi three times from her carrier: once while waiting at the airport, twice on board the plane. Each time, people – whether male or female, tall or short, young or old – would do a double-take when they saw her and, in almost every case, smile. One huge man (at least 6’5″ and built like a barn) saw me holding Psi just after we had gone through security, and said, “That’s such a beautiful cat!”

C: How did Psi take to the flight? Was it stress free? Did she need any medications or special care during the trip or at the airport before?

F: She didn’t seem overly bothered by it. When I took her out of her carrier on board the plane, she was busy looking around, but made no attempt to get away. I don’t know if she was given any medications before I met her at the airport. Before Lisa gave Psi to me, she took her to a bathroom at the airport and expressed her urine and feces and changed her diaper.

F: Would you recommend that other people help out if they can with transporting special needs pets?

C: Absolutely – if you can help, why not do it?

***

Frank was certainly very kind to speak up and help out when he was able. And, because of him, Psi was able to get to her new home with as little stress as possible. Bailey has provided me with a few photos to share of Psi enjoying her new surroundings and her new friends Little Meow and D’Art. Bailey tells me that Psi is doing well and is getting used to her new siblings.

From me to Frank, I’d like to express a big heartfelt thank you. I hope that others can learn from your kindness and see that, with a little extra effort, they can make a big difference. Frank gets two stumps up!

 

D'Art wonders who the baby is

D’Art wonders who the baby is

Nap time after a long trip!

Nap time after a long trip!

Kitties at play

Kitties at play

Bailey and Psi, post-transport

Bailey and Psi, post-transport

 

 

 

 

 

 

D’Artagnan’s New Mom: Why She Adopted Special Needs and You Can, Too

I am so excited to share this very special post with you! Today’s piece is a conversation with Bailey Maitland, the very special twenty-two year old young lady that adopted D’Artagnan, my first ever Bachelor of the Week. Despite his injuries, (he was hit by a car and paralyzed from the waist down) Bailey was drawn to D’Artagnan’s story and drove all the way from Toronto, Canada to New Jersey to pick him up and bring him to his new home. Here is her story.

tabby's place

Bailey and D’Art at Tabby’s Place

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Tell me, Bailey, why did you decide to adopt a cat with special needs?

It all started in July of 2012 while I was working at various gas stations selling a waterless wash and wax for cars. We had gone on a road trip about and hour and a half away to Peterborough, Ontario to explore new territory. After dinner one night, as we were pulling into the hotel parking lot, I noticed something moving awkwardly. I went to investigate it and noticed it was a limping kitten. I caught her and brought her under the light to see what was wrong. I noticed she had open wounds on her paws so I brought her into the hotel lobby and asked the representative what to do. She was working the overnight shift and said she would bring it to the local animal rescue centre in the morning. As soon as I woke up, I phoned the centre and they said they were at capacity. I ran downstairs and told the receptionist that I would take the kitten to a vet.

And what did the vet have to say about this kitten that you found?

He confirmed that she appeared to be paralyzed. He guessed she was around 8-12 weeks old, and she weighed under 1 lb. She was on the brink of starvation. He said she wouldn’t have a very good quality of life and suggested I put her down. I was bawling my eyes out. I couldn’t imagine doing that to a poor helpless creature. I told him I wanted to take care of her and get a second opinion from my vet back home. He then prescribed me antibiotics, and a topical treatment for her wounds. He also gave me some antibacterial soap and deworming medication.

When I brought her to my vet a week later, she had gained over 1 lb. She was back on track to what she should weigh. My vet told me that the kitten had good anal tone, and was able to defecate on her own, but that her bladder needed to be expressed.

Later on, I was able to afford to get her xrays, and the damage was pretty bad. She was also referred to a specialist, who confirmed everything I had been hearing so far: she would never walk again. I considered litter training her, but because she would drag in it, and because she leaked urine sometimes, I decided going the diaper route was the best option.

Diaper time!

Diaper time!

So how did you end up finding D’Artagnan?

I searched the internet to try to find out information on paraplegic kittens as I had no experience whatsoever with disabled animals. I came across catster.com and posted in one of their forums asking for advice. One woman responded saying that I should contact Tabby’s Place. I went to their website and looked over every page with a fine tooth comb. I sent an email mentioning that my kitten’s symptoms were almost identical to “some cat” named D’Artagnan. I received a reply from the founder, Jonathan, and some very helpful tips from their vet tech.

As soon as I saw D’Artagnan’s, profile I fell in love with him. I was always checking for updates, and posted on my Facebook wall a few times that I wanted to adopt him, or have my kitten meet him because they were both paraplegics. I even made jokes about them having “drag races.”

d'artagnan

D’Art in his new home

But you didn’t adopt him right away.

Because I was still in school full time, and had 6 jobs (yes you read that right), my parents wouldn’t let me adopt another kitten since I already had so much on my plate. I told them time and time again that as soon as I finished school and moved out, that I would adopt him anyway. Finally that day arrived, and I stuck to my promise. I drove nine hours to pick him up and nine hours home. It was a long trip but definitely well worth it. It was an honor to finally meet everyone at Tabby’s place and put a face to the names I had been corresponding with.

D'Art and Little Meow

D’Art and Little Meow

D’Art has some needs that people might find time consuming. For instance, he needs his bladder expressed three times a day. How do you fit that into your schedule?

I personally don’t find their needs very time consuming. You have some cats that won’t use the litter box unless you clean up after them every time, so what’s the difference between that and expressing their bladders? I figured if I was already doing it once a day with one cat, it wouldn’t change my life that much to incorporate another into the routine.

And you found Tabby’s Place to be helpful to you?

During my research, I discovered a lot. I learned about kill shelters and no-kill shelters, and disabled pets of all kinds. That was another reason I decided to adopt D’Art: he came from a place with a good heart, and I knew it would open up a spot for a cat who may be in greater need.

D'Art enjoying a Canadian nap

D’Art enjoying a Canadian nap

Are you worried about vet bills? Have you looked into health insurance?

From my understanding, because both the cats already have disabilities, they would not quality for pet insurance. So far the bills haven’t been too hard. I am thankful to have met such wonderful people who have either given me a discount on their services or who have not charged me for their services and only the medicine needed. The big bills were the ones that are typical for every cat, like getting spayed. Luckily for me, D’art came to me already neutered. I hope the costs will be comparable to that of a “normal” cat, but if they’re not, I don’t mind. They’re very special to me, so the cost wouldn’t matter. I would do whatever I needed in order to ensure they got the medical attention they require. Some people have mentioned that if I set up a donation page, they will help contribute to cover any potential costs.

What will you do with your cats if you need to leave town?

I don’t have any plans to go away on vacation any time in the near future as I want to make sure the kittens adjust well to each other, but I have looked into services in my area. There is one in particular that offers in-home care to help minimize the stress an animal will face while you are gone. They can come over multiple times a day so that your pets remain in your home instead of in an unfamiliar room at a boarding place. So I think I would either take advantage of that, or preferably just have my father take care of them. I’m pretty sure he’ll miss the cat more than he misses me when I move out.

D'Art and his Tabby's Place toy

D’Art and his Tabby’s Place toy

What do you want everyone to know about adopting a cat like D’Artagnan?

I want everyone to know that disabled pets come in all forms from FIV+, to paraplegic, to something as simple as a special diet. Yes, some may require a little more attention than others, but the bond you will develop with said pet, I found at least, was way stronger than with a “normal” pet. I think it’s way more rewarding. My kitten has completely changed my life and taught me so many new things. I never knew I could love something so much. Not once have I regretting taking her home, and I am so glad that I did not take my vet’s advice and put her down. I’m sure my experiences with D’art will be the same. He is such a sweet boy, and is a lap cat, which my girl isn’t. You just need to do your research and talk to a vet to find out if a disabled pet is something you can commit to and feel good about. Half the time they don’t even realize they’re disabled. My kitten goes up and down the stairs, jumps off the bed and plays like any other kitten would. I joke that she’s the perfect cat because she can never climb on things and break them or climb on the table and eat the flowers ;).

The New Family

The New Family

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What a touching story! Bailey is really a remarkable lady at a young age, and having such a great animal advocate in the world truly heartens me. I hope that her story makes it clear that adopting a special needs animal is a wonderful experience, and that with some extra effort, your life can be affected in positive ways, not to mention the life of that animal to whom you provide a home. Thank you so much, Bailey for sharing your story with us! My best to you and D’Art and his new sister, Little Meow!