Diapers for Dogs and Cats: A Pet Parents®Review

FTC Disclosure: This post was sponsored by Pet Parents®. We were given a sample product as well as financial compensation to review it. All opinions are our own and we only write about products we think our readers should know about. CatInTheFridge.com does not receive any financial compensation from the sales of these products nor are we compensated if you click through to the company’s links.

Dear Readers,

Today, I, Pinkle (also known as Sprinkle), am here to discuss with you a rather heavy topic. You see, there comes a time in some cats’ lives where they need a little extra help. Such a time has come upon my oldest brother Niles. He has, shall we say, been dropping the water balloons where he ought not to be doing so. Pet Parents® noticed our last post about living with a 19 year old cat and approached us about trying out a product to help curb Niles’ urge to, shall we say, leak information about his whereabouts. It seems he’s especially fond of the office carpet, under the piano, and directly in front of the litter box. Alana decided to take them up on the suggestion and accepted – I’ll just come out and say it – Diapers.

Niles has diapers.

I’ll give you a moment to absorb.

Louie absorbing the info, much like a diaper.

Alana discussed the idea with me, as she does all of her ideas, and we, as a team, decided that it would be worth a try. Now, Pet Parents offers diapers that come in sets of three for both cats and dogs, in a variety of colors. They also come in the same package, so don’t be alarmed if you order “Cat” and get “Dog.” They have assured me they are the same product.

pet parents brand dog diapers

“Dog” Diapers. It’s ok. “Cats” aren’t feeling left out, or anything.

I decided that we needed to get some statement diapers to go along with Niles’ dark complexion, and so we ordered the Princess Pack.

pet parents brand diapers

The Princess Colors

Sure, we could have gone with Black or Natural, but where’s the fun in that? And now, let us begin our review:

The Plan: Niles doesn’t ALWAYS pee on the floor, so we decided he wouldn’t always have to wear the diapers. His main M.O. is to pee when Alana is in another room at home, so he will be wearing the diapers at those times.

The Implementation: It was a little hard to get the diapers on Niles and took a team of two (I stepped back so as not to get accidentally wet) but, once they were on, Niles went with the flow. He was able to walk around with them without incident. He napped in them, ate in them, and generally had no mobility problems while wearing them. He did not, however, pee in them. However, he also didn’t pee on the floor, so that’s a win.

Some Concerns: We had a few concerns that the company addressed for us. Here they are, with a response from Pet Parents®:

Q: Have you had any reports of cats refusing to pee BECAUSE they are wearing the diaper?

A: Some pets are hesitant to pee in the diapers, especially if they aren’t used to them quite yet! It can take some getting used to. But to answer your question straight-forward, no, we have not had any reports of this issue from our customers.

Q:  Are there any concerns with cats that they would hold it for overly long periods of time while wearing the diapers?

A: We haven’t heard any negative feedback from our customers on having issues with cats not holding it in for too long, so it has not been a concern – but just like with anything new, it’s important to observe and pay attention to how your pet is reacting to the new adjustment.

Q: Do you recommend any kind of acclimation period of a few minutes a day to get them used to them before leaving them on all day?

A:  It depends on the pet and their initial reaction to the diaper. No one knows their fur-baby better than the owner so just watch their reaction and maybe slowly introduce them to the diaper, if needed.

Q: Are there any safety issues reported with a pet wearing it while you’re not around?
A: We have not had any reported problems of our diapers being a safety hazard as a lot of customers use them specifically for when they are not at home!

Q: What if Niles has to poop?

A: Our diapers are used for fecal situations, as well.

Ah, yes. “Fecal situations.” Use your imaginations for that one, readers.

The Verdict: So far, Niles hasn’t peed in the diapers. It’s a bit hard to get them on him because, while he’s 19, he leaps away like a frightened gazelle when he sees them coming. I, however, am excellent with costuming so you’ll notice I stepped in to assist for a photo op. I will help Alana any time I can.

Me stepping in as the Model du Jour.

Niles isn’t wearing them all day, but they do offer Alana peace of mind for her floors and carpets. However, she wonders (I can read her mind, we are that close) if perhaps, since Niles wees in specific places, would floor pads such as the Pet Parents Pee Pads be a better option for him?

Who are these for: These would be ideal for a cat or dog who is incontinent and leaking without his own knowledge. These would also work for dogs in heat (please spay your dogs, thanks) or who pee from excitement.

Tips: Make sure you get the right size! Measure your dog or cat first. This is imperative to ensure a fabulous fit.

Pros: The Diapers are washable (unlike our carpets) and are super convenient.

Cons: The shame.

Niles refusing to make eye contact.

Do we recommend them? 

Yes! We, do! These diapers are awesome to have on hand for cats (or dogs) who are having incontinence or spraying issues, or if they’re in heat (because their owners are having spaying issues.) They’re really well made, soft, and easy to maintain. We’re super happy to be able to recommend them, especially because it means there are now MORE OPTIONS FOR GETTING SPECIAL NEEDS PETS WITH LITTER BOX ISSUES INTO HOMES, and that is DEFINITELY something we can get behind.

You can visit Pet Parents® online and order cat diapers here. Let us know your thoughts and leave any questions you might have for the company below. We’ll be happy to pass them on.

Love,

Pinkle.

For the prince(ess) in your life.

Old Dog Vestibular Disease: A Holiday Scare

Dear Readers,

Doodle, our beloved little dog, gave us a serious health scare a few days before Christmas. Picture this: we were sitting on the couch playing a video game and she was tucked betwixt me and The Dude (that’s what the cats call him, so I’ll go with it.) Doodle started panting and I noticed from behind that her head was tilting to the left repeatedly. I hopped down in front of her and looked into her eyes and noticed that she was completely unable to focus. Her eyes were flicking back and forth. She tried to stand but her legs slid right out from under her. I called the GrandFODs up and they came rushing over, but by the time they arrived about 4 minutes later, she was ok and walking again. Based on the way her eyes were moving and my own previous experience, I wondered if she had possibly had a bought of vertigo. Of course, I was also terrified she was having a stroke. I booked a vet appointment for the next morning.

Louie helping with Doodle’s supportive care. She was quite dizzy here.

Our vet, Dr. C. , said that based on the description, it seemed like Doodle had come down with a case of “Old Dog Vestibular Disease.” We were told that many dogs of age (Doodle is over 13) develop this problem out of the blue and the only real option is supportive care. Dr. C. mentioned that if Doodle had had a small episode, she would likely have a longer one, and she was not wrong.

On Christmas day, Doodle got very sick. She was lethargic, her eyes were floating back and forth, and she threw up from queasiness.

Here’s what you might notice if your dog has vestibular disease:

A rapid flicking of the eyes back and forth

A slow movement of the eyes towards one side, as though they are being pulled

Rapid Breathing

Unable to eat or drink on their own

Drooling (From queasiness) or vomiting

Walking in circles

Running into walls or leaning while they walk

 

I put Doodle on 5 days of 25 mg per day of Meclizine, an anti-nausea medication that you can get over the counter. The doctor can also prescribe it. You may also find it as non-drowsy formula Dramamine. This enabled her to eat and drink, though I had to assist her because her depth perception seemed to be off and she was unable to get at the food and water without help.  I also carried her down and up stairs and did not let her walk alone. I brought out her new Ikea pet bed because it’s low to the ground. I did not leave her alone on the couch or any elevated furniture and kept her away from any stairs or drop offs.

Humans who have suffered vertigo may be familiar with the Epley maneuver where your head is rotated into several positions to assist in moving inner ear crystals to maintain balance after an attack. The vet did not recommend this, but I noticed that Dixie was lying on the side to which her eyes were being pulled, so I worked her through the Epley maneuver (Again, this was not vet-recommended) and she seemed to get better shortly thereafter. After five days, Doodle was her self again. She is now handling everything like a champ and is no longer on medication.

If your dog goes through this, some remember that they need supportive care:

Assist your dog with eating and drinking

Do not leave your dog alone for long periods. Considering confining them to a small room or crate, if they’re already used to being crated.

Give them a comfortable place to rest

Provide anti-nausea medication, if vet-recommended

Get a vet checkup if your dog has never experienced this before. We also did a full blood workup and know that Doodle has no other underlying problems, which was worth the peace of mind.

Seeing Old Dog Vestibular Disease in action for the first time is a very scary event. Hopefully, this will help any of you feel less frightened if it happens to your dog. Senior dogs do require some extra care and this is just one of the many things that we can prepare ourselves for ahead of time to better assist our aging friends. Remember, they can get through this with your help!

Doodle is feeling much better but Louie is INSISTING on offering more supportive snuggles. Or maybe he’s just cold.

Happy New Year!

Love,

Alana.

 

Further Reading:

Mercola Pets Vestibular Disorder Article

Pet MD Article on Vestibular Disease

 

Tips for Training Deaf Dogs

You Guys!

Today we have special guest Rendy Schuchat, owner and founder of Anything is Pawzible in Chicago, Il, to talk with us about training deaf dogs! I’ve admitted it before, and I’ll say it again: my best friend is a dog. While she isn’t deaf (although occasionally she acts like it), we wanted to have a little resource for anyone that was considering adopting a deaf dog. Also, modeling for us today will be Doodle (my best friend), because we don’t have any photos of deaf dogs being trained.

Doodle, though not deaf, is ready to pose for our article!

Doodle, though not deaf, is ready to pose for our article!

Welcome, Rendy! Training deaf dogs seems like it might be more challenging than training a dog that can hear. Tell us, what is the most challenging part about training a deaf dog?

Actually, the most challenging part of training a deaf dog is teaching their owners how to shift gears from verbal to hand cues.  Dogs follow body language better than verbal, so attaching meaning to hand cues is what we start with even when the dog can hear!

Yes, I like to blame things on people, too. Are there any tasks that deaf dogs are better at than dogs that can hear?

Once you have their attention, deaf dogs can actually be less distracted because disruptions that an otherwise hearing dog might get distracted by are not present with deaf dogs (buses, kids screaming other dogs barking, etc.)

Training dogs takes quick action to let them know they’ve done something right. How do you immediately tell a deaf dog that they’ve done well if you can’t use a clicker or say “good?”

Before you can teach any dog (hearing or deaf) it is best to attach a “positive marker” that means that was what I wanted! With hearing dogs we use the word “yes!” With deaf dogs, I have used the thumbs up hand cue.  We show them the cue and then give them a treat and continue to repeat until the dog shows visible signs (ears alert, leaning forward, eyes brighten) that they are excited to see that thumbs up signal, which will eventually be tied to exercises we teach.

Perhaps you can walk us through a command. For instance, how do you train a deaf dog to come?

I would take a treat and jog slowly backwards drawing the dog towards me. As the dog began to follow, I would give the “thumbs up” sign and a treat would be given. I would repeat this and begin to shape hand [a] command by pulling the treat towards my chest shaping a hand cue that means “come,” making sure to stop and positively mark the behavior I was looking for. Eventually, we would fade the treat and ask for a sit to finish the exercise. Voila!

Doodle accepting a treat for "Down."

Doodle accepting a treat for “Down.”

Do you ever suggest that deaf dogs be allowed off-leash, either at a dog park or otherwise?

I am not a fan of off-leash unless the area is completely enclosed and safe, especially with a deaf dog. There are just too many distractions you would need to control for which takes individual practice with each of them. If a deaf dogs encounters something that they are uncertain or even frightened by and bolts or spooks, it would be very difficult to get their attention. Many people with deaf dogs will use a vibrating collar in place of their name. It isn’t meant to harm the dog, in fact, just the opposite. We teach the dog that the gentle buzz means “look at me” and something great will happen! These collars could be used in an off leash situation, but lots of rehearsal and practice is necessary before going off leash – and collars we may be relying on to get the dogs attention can fail.

Do you have to teach deaf dogs any special commands as part of their basic training that you wouldn’t otherwise need to teach a regular dog? What are the absolute musts you think a deaf dog must learn as part of basic obedience?

I honestly can’t think of anything a deaf dog must know that a hearing dog wouldn’t. Any command you can teach a hearing dog and deaf dog should learn and vice versa – no limitations!

Doodle flying through agility. Again, she's not deaf, but she looks really cool.

Doodle flying through agility. Again, she’s not deaf, but she looks really cool.

One more question: Besides the buzzing collar, how can you get a hyperactive deaf dog to pay attention to you? He obviously has to be looking at you in order to see the hand cues. Is that ever a problem with dogs that are a little more active or having trouble sitting still?

Hyperactive dogs in general (hearing or not) have a harder time paying attention.  Some of my clients have used a stomp on the floor in place of the collar. If the dog is engaging in a behavior that is undesirable, say jumping up on the counter, the stomp becomes the attention cue and when the dogs looks in your direction a “negative marker,” like a shaking a finger with a stern face, can convey the behavior needs to stop.

I use the stern face command a lot, myself. Thank you so much, Rendy, for helping us learn more about training deaf dogs!

***

If you live in the Chicago area and would like to contact Rendy about dog training, you can reach her at her website at http://anythingspawsible.com

img_hs_rendy Rendy Schuchat, M.A. –  Owner/Founder and Head Dog Trainer at Anything Is PAWZible dog training in Chicago, Illinois. I bring my life-long love for animals together with proven positive dog training techniques that both you and your dog will enjoy. With over a decade of professional experience and a Masters Degree in Psychology as well as a Certification in Dog Obedience Instruction from Animal Behavior Training and Associates, I am committed to helping people build and strengthen their relationships with their dogs. I was voted one of the BEST/FAVORITE DOG TRAINERS in Chicago by Chicagoland Tails Reader’s Choice Awards multiple times.

 

 

 

 

Love,

Crepes!

**Edited by Alana Grelyak. No compensation was exchanged by any party for this post.**