My Vet Visit and What Is Traumeel?

You guys!

First, I’m ok. Nothing serious, but you know I’d rather bathe the dog than visit one of those offices. And yet, I remained stalwart and brave during my visit, and I did not flinch. No, I did not let them see me flinch.

Editor’s note: She sure didn’t, because she hid in her carrier and wouldn’t let anyone see her face.

Me, traveling in style

Me, traveling in style (Editor’s Note: strike “traveling,” insert “hiding”

Let me recap my visit for you in a scientific way:

Reason: MomFOD decided to take me to the doctor because I’ve been exhibiting symptoms of frustration lately. I have chewed, nay “barbered,” the fur on my stump and existing hind leg. I have been cranky with the other cats, and I, um, watered my mom’s outwear.

Editor’s Note: She peed on my jacket.

Method: I got into my pod and went to the doctor for a thorough physical exam.

Note the doctor's keen interest in my stump.

Note the doctor’s keen interest in my stump. Fascinating, I know.

Conclusion: The doctor says I am likely suffering from some pain in my stump and also overuse of my hind leg. She has put me on anti-inflammation pills for the next week to see if this alleviates my symptoms. I don’t know why she didn’t just ask me how I was feeling. I could have told her.

Here’s the scoop on what we’re using:

Name: Traumeel (it was named in Germany)

What is it: A homeopathic mixture of plant and mineral extracts that are used to treat acute musculoskeletal injuries. It’s been available in other countries for more than sixty years and includes Atropa belladonna, Echinacea, Arnica montana, Matricaria recutita, Calendula officinalisAchillea millefolium, Mercurius solubilis, and Hepar sulfuris

Why use it? It’s getting an excellent reputation as an alternative to NSAIDS and cortisone and seems to have useful anti-inflammatory properties without the side effects. It helps alleviate joint pain, muscle pain, and other pain from injuries related to sprains, strains, and injuries.

How to use it: It can be given in pill form (whole or crushed), injection, gels and creams.

Considerations: Make sure you or your pet aren’t allergic to anything in the Traumeel. If using this with your pet, please get your veterinarian’s advice prior to administering it. It is also useful for people, but you’d need to consult your own people doctor for that.

The doctor gave it to me because she thought perhaps I banged my stump and have an acute inflammation. I will be on it for five days.

Have you ever used Traumeel? What do you think?

Love,

Crepes.

PS  Is the vet gone yet?

crepes sleepypodeye

Sources and further reading:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085232/

http://www.drugs.com/cdi/traumeel-ointment.html

 

**Disclaimer: Please do not treat your pets with anything without consulting your veterinarian. This is not advice to treat your pet; We are merely sharing our experience with you and introducing you to what we’ve learned.**

A Probiotic Approach to Treating Kidney Problems and CRF in Cats

Alana here today.

As you know, when something medical occurs at our home, we tend to write about it in order to share our experience. Recently, my eldest kitty Niles went in for his yearly checkup. At the age of fifteen and a half, he had been suffering from occasional vomiting and some weight loss, as well as elevated stomach acid that seemed to be causing nausea.

Niles, at age fifteen and a half.

Niles looking cool.

His blood test results showed elevated levels of creatinine and, though not out of normal range, these levels were indeed higher than last year by a quite a bit. These signs all point to chronic renal failure, also known as CRF. Our doctor suggested a recheck in three weeks and, in the meantime, he was to get started on a probiotic supplement that was entirely new to us. Here is what we found out:

What is it: Azodyl, a patented probiotic supplement that claims to offer enteric dialysis, meaning it helps clean the blood of toxic buildup from the inside using beneficial bacteria that are supposed to aid in kidney function. It is not classified as a drug and does not require a prescription.

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How do you use it: Your veterinarian can help you figure out the dosing for your particular animal. The instructions say that you should not crush it and must give the pill as a whole, but our veterinarian recommended opening the capsule and mixing it into food. Another source online written by a DVM suggested the same thing since the capsules are a bit large for cats and they’re unlikely to swallow them whole. Dogs may be able to take them more easily if hidden in a bit of food.

Cost: Azodyl is a bit pricy. A 90-pill supply can run about $90 or more. You can purchase it online, but it’s recommended to be cold-shipped because the pills must remain chilled, so that may add $25 to $30 to your purchase price.

Our Experience: I decided to wait a few weeks to see how this went for Niles. After three weeks of use, his kidney levels tested lower by .4, (down from 2.4) which the doctor said was excellent. Since then, I have discontinued daily use and am only administering it a few times a week, sometimes only once. If it works as other probiotics do, less frequent use should still replenish the effects. (This isn’t my doctor’s suggestion, but my own.) Niles has had a much greater appetite lately and is drinking far less water, but I have also decreased his dry food and increased his wet food, which could contribute to his water habits. I have also increased his feeding times to more frequent, smaller meals. His vomiting has subsided by 99% and his behavior and energy levels are back to normal.

We’re not positive if the product definitely helped, but the results we saw were positive. The reviews we’ve read online seem to point to a high number of satisfied users, so we wanted to share this information with others in case it may help your own pet.

Have you tried Azodyl? Any thoughts?

Sincerely,

Alana.

 

Further Reading:

A Preliminary Clinical Evaluation of Kibow Biotics, a Probiotic Agent, on Feline Azotemia – Keep in mind, this article uses a small sample size and appears on the Kibow Biotics site. It’s unclear if it was sponsored by Kibow Biotics.

Info on Azodyl from FelineCRF.org

 

**Disclaimer: This is not a paid review. This is a product that we used ourselves for a medical purpose and wanted to share our story with you. No money or goods were exchanged for this article. If you plan to try it, please consult your veterinarian first. **

The Dog (and Cat) Flu in Chicago

You guys,

The Flu is uncool.

The Flu is not to be trusted.

Serious business here in Chicago. Some of you may have heard that we’ve had a major outbreak of flu in dogs . As it turns out, it can also be caught by cats. Here’s a quick time line of events as they happened in our life:

  • MomFOD took Niles to the doctor and overheard them discussing a dog who was “more congested than we’ve ever seen before and had to be hospitalized”
  • The first reports of the flu appeared on the news
  • Dog parks and boarding centers began to shut down. Dog owners were advised strongly to keep their dogs away from others.
  • Chicago TV news indicated that the strain of flu has never been seen outside of China and Korea and that dogs here in the US have almost no immunity to it and the current vaccines aren’t preventing it
  • The flu is found to last up to 48 hours on clothing and hard surfaces and is highly contagious
  • It is discovered that cats can also catch the flu
  • 1100 cases have been reported in Chicago with six deaths thus far

So how are we handling it here? As many of you know, we live in a high rise building in a very crowded area of the city. Doodle is the high risk since she has to leave the building at least three times a day and is unable to do so without running into at least three or more dogs along the way. Therefore, the FODs made the decision to leave her sequestered at the GrandFOD’s house with their dogs. None of them are being allowed to go out for walks, to parks, or to interact with any other dogs. They are being exercised in a private yard.

Both cats and dogs are susceptible.

Both cats and dogs are susceptible.

Some boarding centers have reopened and some parks still remain available to dogs, but people are being urged to avoid contact. Humans should wash their hands after petting any dogs because, although it’s not contagious to people, it can be spread to other animals.

What are the symptoms?

Look for signs of coughing, lethargy, runny nose, and fever.

"No flu for Doo!"

“No flu for Doo!”

 

If your dog presents these symptoms, call your doctor right away. You may need to wait for an appointment since the vets here are overrun with cases. Some vets are asking symptomatic dogs to stay in their cars until they’re seen and to wear masks within the offices.

And still, despite all this, we’ve seen several reports of people on the news saying they’re “unconcerned” and “meh… he’s healthy.” We here are refusing to take any chances with a senior cat, several animals over 10, and kittens with undeveloped immune systems. Doodle stays where it’s safe until this has passed.

What would you do?

Love,

Crepes.

 

Sources and further reading: NBC News

Chicago Tribune